WARNING: Graphic Content

 

cleft_lip

Smoking in pregnancy increases the risk of:-

CLEFT LIP by 34%

A cleft is a congenital birth defect.

There may be a cleft (split) just of the lip, just

of the palate, or both. It occurs when separate

areas of the face do not join together properly

when a baby is developing during pregnancy.

Ref: Dept Health (2007) Review of Health Inequalities & Infant Mortality

Royal College of Physicians (2010) Passive Smoking and Children

http//www.nhs.uk

anal_atresia

Smoking in pregnancy increases the risk of:-

ANAL ATRESIA by 3%

Anal atresia is a defect that is present from birth (congenital).

The opening to the anus is missing or blocked.

Ref: Dept Health (2007) Review of Health Inequalities & Infant Mortality

Royal College of Physicians (2010) Passive Smoking and Children

European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) (2011)

Maternal smoking in pregnancy and birth defects: Human Reproduction Update

cleft_palate

Smoking in pregnancy increases the risk of:-

CLEFT PALATE by 34%

A cleft palate is a gap or split in the roof of the mouth

A cleft lip and palate is the most common facial birth

defect in the UK.

Ref: Dept Health (2007) Review of Health Inequalities & Infant Mortality

Royal College of Physicians (2010) Passive Smoking and Children

http//www.nhs.uk

clubfoot

Smoking in pregnancy increases the risk of:-

CLUB FOOT by 20%

Club foot is a deformity of the foot and ankle

that is present at birth (congenital). If you have

one child with clubfoot then your risk of having a

second child affected is 1 in 35.

Ref: Dept Health (2007) Review of Health Inequalities & Infant Mortality

Royal College of Physicians (2010) Passive Smoking and Children

http//www.nhs.uk

prematurebirth

Smoking in pregnancy increases the risk of:-

PREMATURE BIRTH by 27%

About one baby in every 13 will be born prematurely –

in other words, before the 37th week of pregnancy.

Ref: Dept Health (2007) Review of Health Inequalities & Infant Mortality

Royal College of Physicians (2010) Passive Smoking and Children

http//www.nhs.uk

gastroschisis

Smoking in pregnancy increases the risk of:-

GASTROSCHESIS by 3%

The condition in which a baby has a small hole in the front of

the abdomen, just to the side of the umbilical cord, through

which some of the bowel (intestine) is protruding.

Ref: Dept Health (2007) Review of Health Inequalities & Infant Mortality

Royal College of Physicians (2010) Passive Smoking and Children

European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) (2011)

Maternal smoking in pregnancy and birth defects: Human Reproduction Update

Smokers placenta

Smokers placenta

Healthy placenta

Healthy placenta

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